All posts by Tanya Tanya

Admin panel for Radar distributors


Admins finally have a full-featured work panel. What opportunities does it provide?

Client Management. 

You can see all your clients and their subscriptions in the Home tab and manage subscriptions if necessary. Let’s say your client urgently needs a couple more days of trial to show everything in detail to the management. You can help him with a couple of clicks.

Activity Stream.

You can explore some activities for tenants (no sensitive data is available–factual actions only). For example, who and how often log in, changes in payment information. On this basis, you can offer the client a more suitable plan (designed for a larger or smaller number of users) or track which of the clients visited last and made any critical changes.

Notifications and Newsletter.

In these tabs, you can place texts of notifications and letters to clients– in English or German. The system will select which language to provide depending on the language of their interface. This will help users stay informed of the newly developed functionality and discounts.

User Management. 

Here you can add users and manage accesses. There are three roles: admin, viewer, and content manager. Admin has all the same rights as you. The Viewer can only browse, but cannot change anything. Content Manager has no access to manage subscriptions, but can manage emails and notifications.

Get started!

In this update, we’ve been more focused on distributors. New features for users are also on the way. Stay tuned! Send your request here contact@projects-radar.com to learn more about how to become our distributor.


Leading bed bank achieved integration success by maximizing transparency among employees 


Challenge

Looking to strengthen its market position, a global B2B distributor of accommodation and ancillary products to the world’s travel industry has purchased a competitor.

To make the acquisition a success, the organization’s internal integration team needed a solution that could track critical activities in the post-deal phase and promote the takeover among employees on both sides.

Solution

The integration involved multiple functional areas and teams distributed across several countries. Given the complexity of the undertaking, transparency was deemed critical to the successful unification of two organizations and their cultures.

Radar was used to plan and schedule tasks and initiatives of the integration program and has been established as the chief source of information about the implementation status and progress, timeline, achievements, priorities, and future activities.

General program updates were shared with all affected by the integration on a defined communication schedule. However, to make people feel more included and prepared for the coming changes, they were given independent access to the system and could subscribe to receive email notifications on items of interest to them.

Results

The integration program was implemented in accordance with the original plan in just 2.5 years.

According to the post-acquisition employee survey, the teams of both organizations were duly informed of the coming changes throughout the integration. Many confirmed to have a clear understanding of their own future and company goals.

None of those who happened to leave the company during this period have mentioned the acquisition among the reasons.


4 types of risks in project management and ways to handle them


Risk management is one of the mandatory aspects of managing any project. A risk is an uncertain event or condition, the occurrence of which positively or negatively affects one or more project objectives. All risks can be roughly divided into four categories.

Known unknowns 

These are classic risks, most often we talk about them. We do not know exactly whether they will occur, but we can speculate or guess.

Example: In one project, a freelancer stopped answering the phone and disappeared without doing his work–we can assume that this risk could happen again in our new project.

Known knowns

Facts and requirements are another category of risk.

Example: If you own a car, you know that you have to have it serviced regularly–then you don’t have to worry about breakdowns due to lack of maintenance.

In fact, it’s not even a risk, it’s a requirement to have your car serviced at regular intervals. Similarly, if you don’t want to lose data, you make regular backups before any changes. These are also requirements, but they become risks if we don’t comply with them. The machine can break down, the data can be lost.

Unknown knowns

We almost never think about this category of risk. These are the unknown-knowns–those hidden facts that exist outside our world picture. 

Example: Your acquaintance is working in Africa on one project. One day elephants come to the construction site and, after trampling and scattering everything, go back to the savannah. The residents of the local village are not surprised, for them it is a familiar picture of the world. Could the manager from New York have thought of this? No, in his world elephants live in a zoo and do not attack anything. In his world, this risk does not exist.

It is possible to identify hidden facts only by stepping outside the box. To step outside the box, it is possible to involve outside experts, communicate more with the community, and watch different cases.

Unknown unknowns

The most unpleasant category of risks is the emerging risks, the unknown unknowns.

Example: COVID-19. Could humanity assume that through a chain of animal carriers humans would be infected with a terrible virus that would change our entire habitual lives? Extremely low probability. It is an event from the realm of the famous Black Swans – completely unpredictable. 

That is, the risks that arise are things we couldn’t even think of because they either never happened, or it was impossible to predict. This is something that we can’t foresee or anticipate. But we can work on the project’s resilience to risk by making sufficient provisions in both the schedule and the budget – and that’s not a small thing. If our project is easy to accept change, and our processes are clear, we can detect such risks much earlier than they appear.

Threats and opportunities

Risks can be both negative (threats) and positive (opportunities). Negative risks can lead to a worsening of the situation–the development period will increase, the cost of work will increase, and we will get a lower quality product. When planning, we often pay attention to the threats.

Example: As a result of vague terms of reference (reason), we can misunderstand the tasks (risk) and make a product that does not meet the expectations of the customer (consequence).

We rarely think about positive risks. In fact, we don’t even make a habit of calling something positive a risk. But why don’t we manage our opportunities? With them, we can reduce testing time, reduce labor costs, and make better features–all these affect the goal of the project.

What risks should not be confused with

First: risk is not a reason. If we are launching a new product, or even if we have never done such a project before, these are not risks, they are facts and the harsh reality in which we find ourselves. So different risks can follow from these reasons that each one will need to be handled differently.

Second, don’t confuse risks with consequences. “We won’t meet the deadline,” “The product won’t meet the expectations of potential users” are exact consequences. And each will be a consequence of different risks. To distinguish what is in front of us – the cause, the risk, or the consequence – let’s practice formulating risk.

Formulate the risk so it can be handled

A good risk formulation should include cause, risk, and consequence. Risk always arises for a reason. We will work with the risk itself in the project. And the consequences are what the risk can lead us to.

For example, we have never done this project before, so we could agree to too tight a deadline, and therefore we will not meet the deadline.

As a result, from this formulation, we can understand:

  • why we have this risk (we are doing this project for the first time);
  • what threatens us (we estimated the deadline incorrectly) is the risk or the threat;
  • how it will affect the goal of the project (at least we will finish the project later) – this is a consequence of the risk.

If you formulate risk using this formula, you can easily understand what you need to work on so that negative risk doesn’t occur and positive risk can be taken advantage of.

Summary

So, risk happens. 🙂 The challenge for the project manager is to take all risks into account as much as possible. In our experience, automating processes that do not require the direct participation of a manager helps free up time for strategic planning and a greater focus on project development.

How can we help with this? Radar is a tool for project management and status-reporting, which helps you easily monitor all projects. You see all the processes and progress of your projects at a glance, spend less time on data collection and reporting, and improve team communication through transparency.

Streamlined Export and Import + New Contact Form


Every day at Radar, we’re cooking up new ways for teams to manage their projects seamlessly, no matter where or how you work. This month, we released enhancements designed to improve user experience. Now you can easily feedback to us (thanks to the new contact form) and assess the enhanced process of importing and exporting data.

New contact form

It’s easier to stay in touch with us now. We have implemented a quick contact form. Click on the question button at the bottom of the menu and then on the letter icon. Have any questions? You’re welcome!

Presentation slides are generated in a certain order to make your work as efficient and easy as possible:

  • Title slide
  • Project fields slides
  • Status report slides
  • Connected projects slides
  • Attached documents slides
  • Associated views slide

Helpful tips

  • The feature is available in English and German
  • The feature is available in any browser
  • Please be aware, that currently, the customization of the presentation template is not available, but we are working on it

Get started!!

Delivering dynamic presentations in PowerPoint will provide you with the greatest efficiency and help you to improve data analysis. For further assistance please contact our support team.


Automotive

Automotive conglomerate deploys Radar to improve portfolio reporting


Automotive

Challenge

In preparing monthly portfolio reports, the PMO of an international multi-brand group used a lot of reports of various formats and from different sources.

In the absence of a central solution, data consolidation was laborious, and the final report presented to the project steering committee was at risk of being unreliable.

Solution

Radar was deployed as a management control and reporting system company-wide to have all project data collected in one place.

Simple standardized web forms with built-in validation mechanisms were implemented to increase the quality of project status reports. The effect achieved – more accurate, complete and up-to-date reports across the enterprise.

Information submitted in individual reports, such as the monthly project status and other related matters, is used to generate portfolio reports directly in the system and almost instantly, empowering the PMO to react to and report on the latest developments in the projects in a timely manner.

Results

Radar now helps the PMO to save dozens of work hours a year, while the steering committee benefits from the constant access to a big-picture overview and a clearer understanding of how individual projects progress.

The key benefit achieved overall is in the ability to quickly identify projects that are most worth pursuing.


The Alumni Association builds trust and awareness of key stakeholder groups


Challenge

A university alumni association is responsible for organizing social events aimed at current and former students, raising funds to support science and state study programs, and creating an effective networking platform for over 20,000 graduates.

As part of the obligation to its current sponsors and to attract new donors, the association sought to achieve full transparency regarding its activities and spending.

Solution

Radar was introduced to reach and engage three groups of stakeholders – sponsors, potential donors, and regular members.

The association used the solution to visualize and track the progress and status of the planned and running activities in six key areas: alumni, students, employment, education, science, and university brand promotion.

All such activities not only openly outlined pursued objectives and deliverables, but were accompanied by financial statements with detailed descriptions of incurred costs, expense claims, and receipts. This allowed current and potential donors to find out if their donations have been used wisely and then make informed decisions about supporting the organization in the future.

Radar was embedded into the association’s website to provide constant self-serve access to the registered users, as well as projected live on-screen on several occasions. To raise awareness of upcoming events and other planned initiatives, a link to a public Radar view was regularly shared in the alumni newsletter.

Results

Together with a rapid increase in event attendance and one-off donations, a handful of regular sponsors have been acquired, which is most vital for the continuity of the association and its goals.

Overall, by making the organizational structure, responsibilities, activities history, and allocation of funds clear and transparent, the association has laid a strong foundation for lasting relationships with all its stakeholders.


Export to MS PowerPoint is available


Radar now gives you more space for content and a more flexible experience – export to MS PowerPoint is available with just a few clicks!

How it works

The new feature saves your time and provides your reports with slide suggestions powered by MS PowerPoint. Open the “Edit Project” panel or page in your Radar App – a new menu item “Export to PPT” is currently displayed.

Exported PPT files are optimized and loaded into a new browser tab so you can continue working on the reports while the file is being generated. The generated file gets the name “Project report. pptx”. The content of the generated file is similar to the content of the corresponding PDF file that the Radar users already know well.

Presentation slides are generated in a certain order to make your work as efficient and easy as possible:

  • Title slide
  • Project fields slides
  • Status report slides
  • Connected projects slides
  • Attached documents slides
  • Associated views slide

Helpful tips

  • The feature is available in English and German
  • The feature is available in any browser
  • Please be aware, that currently, the customization of the presentation template is not available, but we are working on it

Get started!

Delivering dynamic presentations in PowerPoint will provide you with the greatest efficiency and help you to improve data analysis. For further assistance please contact our support team.


Global automaker is set to drive its corporate innovation strategy the smart way


Challenge

A leading car manufacturer is constantly growing and diversifying its portfolio through innovation and new product development.

However, in order to optimize the creation of value and to make the right investment decisions, corporate executives demanded a more effective means to define and manage the company’s innovation strategy.

Solution

The company implemented Radar to map out and execute the entire corporate innovation strategy amounting to over 1000 projects and spanning numerous business functions, brands, production sites, and geographic locations.

The Radar solution was used to build a roadmap and to closely track projects from their ideation through implementation and complete realization of financial impact.

While presenting a clear high-level view of the strategy, Radar also provided an ability to dig deeper into details: to analyze the requirements that served as the basis for an idea or a product and to monitor projected and actual financial effects.

Results

By using Radar as an integrating solution and thereby making the audit process more efficient, the company reduced audit costs by 23%.

The overall optimization of financial reporting has also resulted in improved cash flow. The company no longer has millions of euros in unpaid invoices and can close projects without delay.


Consulting firm set up a productive interaction with the client, keeping him up to date


Challenge

A large European railroad company hired a consulting firm to create a shared service center. It had to provide weekly progress reports and allow customer representatives to track the project closely.

Solution

Radar was brought in as a project reporting tool that allowed to share information both with key people inside the firm and on the client’s side, all while using one system and the same data that the whole team could update simultaneously.

The firm used Radar to outline the design of the project and achieve buy-in, develop a transition roadmap, and further support the roll-out phase.

Results

At every stage, the firm shared progress using reports in varying levels of detail. Among such reports were those that reflected the overall performance across a diverse set of initiatives. The progress of each of the eight work streams in areas such as technology, communication, and HR, as well as the status of individual items in the work streams.